On November 6, 2020, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “FRB”) announced that, beginning in 2021, its Large Institution Supervision Coordinating Committee (“LISCC”) supervisory program will apply only to Category I firms as defined in the FRB’s tailoring framework.  This change will have the effect of removing three foreign banking organizations (“FBOs”) with U.S. operations from the LISCC portfolio.  Going forward, only U.S. firms that are designated as global systemically important banks (“U.S. G-SIBs”) will be included in the LISCC portfolio.
Continue Reading Federal Reserve’s LISCC Program to Apply Only to U.S. G-SIBs

On October 22, 2019, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) issued two letters concluding that three Federal Reserve Supervision and Regulation letters, SR 12-17: Consolidated Supervision Framework for Large Financial Institutions, SR 14-8: Consolidated Recovery Planning for Certain Large Domestic Bank Holding Companies, and SR 11-7: Guidance on Model Risk Management, are “rules” under the Congressional Review Act (“CRA”) and therefore must be submitted to Congress and the Comptroller General for review before they can take effect.  The GAO letters respond to requests made by several senators for determinations of whether the three SR letters, as well as SR 15-7: Governance Structure of the Large Institution Supervision Coordinating Committee (LISCC) Supervisory Program, are rules under the CRA.  The GAO concluded that SR 15-7 is not a rule under the CRA.

Continue Reading GAO Concludes Three SR Letters Are Rules Under Congressional Review Act

On March 6, 2019, the Federal Reserve issued a final rule to exempt from the qualitative component of the Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (“CCAR”) exercise large firms that have participated in CCAR for four consecutive years and have passed the final year’s qualitative component without objection.  The final rule serves to provide an immediate exemption for all domestic bank holding companies currently subject to CCAR, and to phase out the qualitative objection for U.S. intermediate holding companies of foreign banks (“IHCs”).

Continue Reading Federal Reserve Eliminates CCAR’s Qualitative Objection for Most Firms