capital conservation buffer

Today, March 23, 2020, the Federal Reserve issued an interim final rule that revises the definition of “eligible retained income” for purposes of the total loss-absorbing capacity (“TLAC”) buffer requirements that apply to global systemically important banking organizations (“G-SIBs”).  The rule amends the “eligible retained income” definition in the same manner as the federal banking agencies’ interim final rule of March 17, 2020, which, as we summarized previously, revised that definition for purposes of the regulatory capital rules that apply to all U.S. banking organizations.

Continue Reading Federal Reserve Eases Application of TLAC Buffer

Today, March 17, 2020, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “FRB”), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”) released an interim final rule that revises the definition of “eligible retained income” in the regulatory capital rules that apply to U.S. banking organizations.  The rule is intended to incentivize banking organizations to more freely use their capital buffers, thereby promoting increased lending activity in light of the global economic turmoil created by COVID-19.  The rule will be effective immediately upon publication in the Federal Register.

Continue Reading In Response to COVID-19, Banking Agencies Issue Interim Final Rule Revising Capital Buffer Requirements to Promote Lending

On July 9, 2019, the federal banking agencies released a final rule to simplify aspects of the regulatory capital rules for banking organizations that are not “advanced approaches” banking organizations, i.e., those with less than $250 billion in total consolidated assets and less than $10 billion in total foreign exposure.  Initially proposed in September 2017 as part of the agencies’ ongoing efforts to meaningfully reduce regulatory burden on small and mid-sized banking organizations, the final rule is intended to simplify and clarify certain aspects of the capital rules, and in particular the capital treatment of mortgage servicing assets, certain deferred tax assets, investments in the capital instruments of unconsolidated financial institutions, and minority interests.  Importantly, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Board”) also used the rulemaking as an opportunity to streamline an important aspect of its regulatory framework by permitting bank holding companies, savings and loan holding companies, and state member banks of all sizes to redeem or repurchase their common stock without obtaining formal, prior regulatory approval under most circumstances.

Continue Reading Federal Reserve Rationalizes Stock Buyback Rules