Artificial Intelligence (AI)

On December 10, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) held a joint workshop on accuracy in consumer reporting. The workshop included remarks from FTC Commissioner Noah Joshua Phillips, CFPB Assistant Director for Supervision Policy Peggy Twohig, CFPB Deputy Director Brian Johnson, and FTC Deputy Director for the Bureau of Economics Andrew Stivers. The workshop included four panels:

  • Panel 1: Furnisher Practices and Compliance with Accuracy Requirements
  • Panel 2: Current Accuracy Topics for Traditional Credit Reporting
  • Panel 3: Accuracy Considerations for Background Screening
  • Panel 4: Navigating the Dispute Process

Panelists included a range of stakeholders in the consumer reporting ecosystem, including representatives from consumer reporting agencies (“CRAs”), trade associations, furnishers, and consumer advocacy organizations.

In her closing remarks, Maneesha Mithal, Associate Director in the FTC’s Division of Privacy & Identity Protection, discussed three key takeaways and themes from the workshop:

  • (1) Alternative Data: Mithal noted that the issue of alternative data came up on almost every panel, and that there appeared to be a consensus that using some types of alternative data may benefit consumers and the industry. Mithal noted that a number of panelists expressed caution about using “fringe data,” including social media data.In a panel discussion, Michael Turner, founder and President of the Policy and Economic Research Council (“PERC”), drew a distinction between “proven payment data,” including payments for utilities, media, and rent, and unproven “fringe data” or “unstructured data,” including information from social media. Turner, along with a number of other panelists, believed that reporting proven payment data would be beneficial for consumers. Francis Creighton, President and CEO of the Consumer Data Industry Association (“CDIA”), noted that consumers are currently experiencing the “downside” impacts of the reporting of negative information about the non-payment or late payment of obligations for utilities, media, and rental housing, but are not receiving the “upside” benefits of reporting on the positive payment histories on those recurring obligations. Consumer advocates, such as Ed Mierzwinski of U.S. Public Interest Research Group (“PIRG”), expressed skepticism regarding the use of certain alternative data, such as utility payment data, and the ability of the industry to ensure the accuracy of such data.
  • (2) Role of Technology: Mithal also noted that there was some consensus that technology, including Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) and pattern recognition, may improve the quality and accuracy of consumer report information. Mithal stated that there appeared to be less consensus regarding the use of technology in data matching, with some panelists expressing the view that manual review is still necessary to ensure maximum possible accuracy. Mithal also noted that some panelists expressed the view that the CFPB should exercise its supervisory authority to examine CRAs and furnishers’ use of technology in consumer reporting.
    • In general, industry panelists spoke favorably about the prospects for AI and other technologies. For example, Eric Ellman, Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Legal Affairs at CDIA, discussed the use of technology in dispute intake, including filtering credit repair disputes from legitimate consumer disputes. Chi Chi Wu of the National Consumer Law Center expressed skepticism about relying on AI and other technologies for data matching and dispute investigations.
  • (3) Accuracy: Mithal concluded by discussing the accuracy of consumer reporting more generally, and stated that some panelists believe that the regulators should issue specific guidance in this area. Mithal also noted that panelists discussed both the importance of data accuracy with respect to consumer reports and furnished data, including ways in which CRAs may oversee furnishers.
    • In general, industry panelists pointed to substantial improvements made in recent years with regard to the accuracy of consumer reports, with repeated emphasis on improvements brought about by the National Consumer Assistance Plan (“NCAP”), an outgrowth of a multi-state attorney general settlement with the three nationwide CRAs in May 2015. Turner discussed improvements between the early and more recent studies of data accuracy. Consumer advocates stressed continuing problems with data accuracy, including the reappearance of derogatory information on consumer reports.


Continue Reading FTC and CFPB Host Workshop on Accuracy in Consumer Reporting

On February 27th, Reps. Brenda Lawrence (D-Mich.) and Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) introduced a resolution emphasizing the need to ethically develop artificial intelligence (“AI”). H. RES. 153, titled “Supporting the development of guidelines for ethical development of artificial intelligence,” calls on the government to work with stakeholders to ensure that AI is developed in a

On December 3, 2018, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Federal Reserve), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”), the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”), the National Credit Union Administration (“NCUA”), and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) (collectively, “agencies”) released a joint statement on innovative efforts to combat money laundering and terrorist financing.

In the joint statement, the agencies encouraged banks to consider and, if appropriate, responsibly implement innovative approaches with respect to their anti-money laundering (“AML”) and Bank Secrecy Act (“BSA”) compliance obligations. In particular, the agencies discussed innovative internal financial intelligence units that may be tasked with “identifying complex and strategic illicit finance vulnerability and threats.” The agencies also discussed artificial intelligence and digital identity technologies and recognized the value of these innovative approaches in strengthening banks’ BSA/AML compliance programs, as well as potentially reducing compliance costs.

Continue Reading Financial Agencies Release Joint Statement on Innovative Efforts to Combat Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing

On July 9, 2018, the Economic Affairs Committee of the European Parliament (the “EP”) published a study identifying potential competition law concerns in the financial technology (“FinTech”) sector (the “Study”).

This Study follows the Consumer Financial Services Action Plan launched by the European Commission in March 2017, which aimed to promote greater choice and better

On October 12, 2016, the White House released a report on the future of artificial intelligence and its potentially transformative impact on the economy and society.  Although the report does not focus on the application of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in the financial services industry, it provides a helpful overview of the different categories of technology presently referred to as AI, provides an explanation of machine learning systems in layman terms, and highlights risks associated with the adoption and implementation of AI-enabled products that will be of interest to financial services companies developing or implementing AI technology.

Continue Reading The Future of Artificial Intelligence in Financial Services